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An important message from System 7 Today founder Dan Palka
 
 Topic: S7T Applications DB... (Page 2 of 3)
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  blackangel (Profile)
  16 MB
 
Posted: Fri Jan 23, 2009 3:37 am
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then why have you got a System7today website?... Aren't you the admin for the site... You should have done one for X apps, and let someone else do CLASSIC aka yester years OS System 7 AKA COOL stuff.

And if you read my proposition... well, this can be applied to X or PC/Micro$oft, Palm, and any other variant, the difference is in FILE TYPE/CREATOR CODE, which is Pre Leopard on Mac specific.

A tendency which Leopard has dropped and HElll... i went back to 8.3 days just like good old DOS. Now I can rename my files with the .exe extension and unless it has a file type/creator code, kindly changes its file icon to PC, and launches Virtual PC on me... fasinating. I though X was meant to be a smart cookie... obviously NOT!
  
  dpaanlka (Profile)
  1024 MB
 
Posted: Fri Jan 23, 2009 11:45 am
Quote
  
blackangel wrote:

then why have you got a System7today website?... Aren't you the admin for the site... You should have done one for X apps, and let someone else do CLASSIC aka yester years OS System 7 AKA COOL stuff.


You joined this site toward the end of 2008, but I created it quite a few years before that (2005), and the predecessor to this site like in 2003 ("Hooper Hotrodding" - see archive). I still enjoy System 7 and find it really fun, but I can't devote much time to this anymore because A: it's not financially beneficial and B: there isn't really much new information to discover anymore and C: System 7 in 2009 is not like System 7 in 2003, for me it is essentially diminished to purely a hobby. Traffic to System 7 Today has steadily declined since the fall of 2007, and is now at it's lowest point ever.

Now I know some people really do use System 7, like, for real. For this reason I keep the site going and activity flowing, and occasionally update it here and there. But even among the members of this small group, the reason isn't because System 7 is superior to Leopard. Nobody thinks that but you.

It is instead for various reasons like financial frugality, pre-existing expensive hardware setups (like Avid systems), no *need* for the advanced features of Leopard, or the simplicity and humbleness of System 7 that allows some to feel more creative or expressive.

blackangel wrote:

A tendency which Leopard has dropped and HElll... i went back to 8.3 days just like good old DOS. Now I can rename my files with the .exe extension and unless it has a file type/creator code, kindly changes its file icon to PC, and launches Virtual PC on me... fasinating. I though X was meant to be a smart cookie... obviously NOT!


This is just the way things are. There are plenty of benefits of having file extensions, like compatibility with the rest of the world, for example. No need for MacLinkPlus translators, another example. Besides, if you bring an old classic file over to a Leopard machine, it will still recognize it by it's file type and creator, even on an Intel. So be thankful that Apple at least threw us that bone.

Mac OS X is so infinitely superior to Mac OS 7/8/9 that I can't believe this discussion ever even comes up. You're ignoring all logic and sense for the sake of nostalgia. If we were still using Mac OS 9, then Apple would have a microscopic market share, if they even still existed.

Please stop filling up our forum with this stuff.
  
  jjbomfim (Profile)
  32 MB
 
Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 6:42 am
Quote
  
dpaanlka wrote:



Mac OS X is so infinitely superior to Mac OS 7/8/9


Hell, I use a 1400 running 7.6 as my main work machine, and even I agree with that statement. OS X is way, way superior to 7. I'll be the first to admit that. Just take web browsing, for example. It's such an inherent part of personal computing today, and I'll again be the first to admit that it is just a crappy experience to browse the net through System 7. I'll still keep using my 1400c and 7.6 for all my writing needs, mostly because of the gorgeous keyboard on the 1400c and because my text editor is a VERY modified Tex-Edit Plus that I just can't get anywhere (the closest thing would be to modify emacs, but then I'd have to invest a lot of time on the steep learning curve). For anything else - if I had to work with audio, video, or anything internet related besides simple email, OS X and even Windows XP is a better solution, hands down.
  
  Lichen Software (Profile)
  128 MB
 
Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 10:23 am
Quote
  
I am sitting here typing on a PB 1400 with a 333 G3, 30 Gb HD and 2 Gb CF card, wireless, running 8.6 and 7.6. I have 2 other PB 1400's both wireless, one with a 233 G3 and the other original.

I also run a 7100 with a 400 MHz G3 running 7.6, 8.1, 8.6 and 9.0.

Then there is the G3, bumped to 400 MHz, 50 Gb HD, 104 Mb ram runing 9.0.1 and 10.3.

Finally there is the Starmax 3000 running 8.1.

So, one could say I am invested in Mac Classic OS's.

This site is invaluable to me. I consider Classic as possibly the best single user experience ever ... If it will do what you need to do. This site puts it all together like no other.

Now, OS X does things that classic will never do, elegantly and without fail.

I really know the insides of the Classic system folder .. Because I had to to keep from crashing. I know almost nothing about OSX ... Don't need to.

OS X has allowed the user functionality of computers to grow by leaps and bounds. The iLife suite is not possible in Classic.

OS X functions in both a multi tasking and multi user environment in a far superior manner than classic.

OS X is insherently more secure due to the BSD underpinnings. This is a real issue in a corporate environment.

Yes, Classic is faster for the same power - about 2.5 to 1 - but again, only if you can do it on Classic. The new machines have power to burn, so it is no longer an issue.

So Classic will fade but not die. Amiga has not died either. People remember good things and keep them alive. But functionality will continue and improve in the newer systems.

I am using a legacy, not a cutting edge tool. I really really enjoy it for what it is. Very similar to going back and using my hand tools instead of power tools.

Dave
  
  dpaanlka (Profile)
  1024 MB
 
Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 11:24 am
Quote
  
jjbomfim wrote:

I'll still keep using my 1400c and 7.6 for all my writing needs


Lichen Software wrote:

I am using a legacy, not a cutting edge tool. I really really enjoy it for what it is. Very similar to going back and using my hand tools instead of power tools.


Like me, would it be safe to assume that you both also fall into this category?

dpaanlka wrote:

the simplicity and humbleness of System 7 that allows some to feel more creative or expressive


I didn't come up with that theory, someone else did and I read it somewhere, but I forget where. I always though it really explained very well why I would still use System 7.
  
  Lichen Software (Profile)
  128 MB
 
Posted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 4:30 pm
Quote
  
dpaanlka wrote:

jjbomfim wrote:

I'll still keep using my 1400c and 7.6 for all my writing needs


Lichen Software wrote:

I am using a legacy, not a cutting edge tool. I really really enjoy it for what it is. Very similar to going back and using my hand tools instead of power tools.


Like me, would it be safe to assume that you both also fall into this category?

dpaanlka wrote:

the simplicity and humbleness of System 7 that allows some to feel more creative or expressive


I didn't come up with that theory, someone else did and I read it somewhere, but I forget where. I always though it really explained very well why I would still use System 7.


Yup. Think of it like putting on that comfortable sweater before getting down to work.

Also... I am a minimalist at heart. I love that I can use a box cutter instead of a radial arm saw some times.
  
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